DogTread https://dogtread.com Dog Treadmills to Treat Behavior and Health Challenges Mon, 07 Aug 2017 16:24:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.6 DogTread Thanksgiving Day- Walk With Us! https://dogtread.com/dogtread-thanksgiving-day-walk-with-us/ Fri, 11 Nov 2016 16:07:13 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9957 Join us on Thanksgiving Day, November 24th, for our DogTread “Walk With Us” Event

dog-run-blog-dogtreadObesity, a common and costly health issue that increases risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, affects more than one-third of adults and 17 percent of youth in the United States. By the numbers, 78 million adults and 12 million children are obese—figures many regard as an epidemic. 40% of our dogs are over-weight too. With such alarming obesity statistics, much focus has been placed on the causes of obesity.

At the top of the leader board, are poor diet and minimal exercise.  In recent years, many physical activities for both adults and children, have been replaced by T.V. and computer time.

As Americans we all fall into the old Thanksgiving Day Routine- Eat, Lounge, Watch Football, REPEAT. This Thanksgiving Day, take 30 minutes out of your day and take a walk with your dog, your family, get some fresh air and STEP UP for your HEALTH!

Join us on Thanksgiving Day for our DogTread Walk With Us Event from your location and be entered to win a Travel Bowl and Bottle to take on your next hike or walk! We will choose 5 lucky winners from those who submit their photo and use the hashtag #DogTreadWalkWithUsEvent.

Studies on Exercise and Walking for Fitness with Dogs

On an average day, 30 percent of American adults walk for exercise and with good reason. Walking doesn’t require special equipment or athletic skills, yet it offers a host of health benefits- from helping you lose weight and lifting your mood to controlling diabetes and lowering your blood pressure. Find 10 more reasons to go for a walk RIGHT NOW here: 10 Reasons to Go for A Walk NOW

A twelve month study has shown that exercising with your dog has numerous positive benefits for people and dogs.  The People and Pets Exercising Together (PPET) study found people who are trying to lose weight often need a positive support system of friends, co-workers and relatives.  Unfortunately, these same people can negatively affect an individual’s exercise plan by sabotage and even negative influences.  Exercising with your dog however, brings fun and enthusiasm not seen in other programs.

Thanksgiving Day Walk With Us Event

Get ready for Turkey Day by taking your dog, your kids, your family or your friends for a walk before the big feast and football game.  It’s true that Thanksgiving usually brings many hours of sitting and eating while we watch others run up and down the field. Or maybe we’re taking in some Zzzz’s after eating all that turkey and stuffing!

RSVP for the DogTread Thanksgiving Day Walk With Us Event and be entered to win a Travel Bowl and Bottle for your next outdoor adventure!

How to Play the Walk With Us Event:

  1. Go to our DogTread Facebook page and click “Like”.
  2. Go to our EVENTS page and RSVP to our THANKSGIVING DAY WALK WITH US EVENT.
  3. Post a status note ON the event page that says:  I’m in on the DogTread Thanksgiving Day Walk With Us Event!
  4. On Thanksgiving walk for 30 minutes with your dog and take a photo.
  5. Post your note and photo on the Event Page page that says:  I completed 30 minutes of exercise with my dog on Turkey Day with your photo!

Once you’ve completed the 5 steps you’ll be entered to win a Travel Bowl and Bottle. 5 LUCKY people will be drawn and announced on Friday, November 25th.

Have fun, wag more and join the movement… your dog needs exercise every day.  So do you. GET WALKING!

 

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Helping Lucy’s Pain https://dogtread.com/helping-lucys-pain/ Thu, 23 Jul 2015 21:04:41 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9647 Treadmill Workouts are Great for Laggers & Leash Pullers
DogTread Blog Kerry Fisher DVM

———————–Lucy all smiles

 Consider Treadmill Work during Early Rehabilitation

Lucy recently came in with back pain. This darling little dog loves to sniff the ground during outside walks; she often lags behind her owner and needs some encouragement with the leash attached to her harness. Lucy’s history included a variety of pain management treatments. I recommended a series of acupuncture treatments along with rehabilitative exercises to strengthen her core (which includes her low back muscles) and her hind legs. We meet up in the Canine Gym but also Lucy will have homework to dog. My program also includes balance work and body awareness. After several acupuncture treatments, we progress to introduction to Treadmill walking. Lucy hopped onto the treadmill and went right to work. I can encourage a more normal posture during treadmill work (vs walking outside). We will increase the speed and ask for better form as time goes on and Lucy’s body becomes stronger. You’ll see in the video that we have the side down for filming. Some dogs may be more comfortable with the sides up for their first time on the treadmill.

 It’s so Important to Assess Posture and Observe Form

Lucy moves constantly with her head on the ground – sniffing. When dogs are in this position they barely have any weight on their hind legs. Over time, hind legs can lose some muscle mass, tone and neuromuscular control. When Lucy positions herself into a sit, her hind legs slide out sideways, even on a non-skid floor.

 Time for Strengthening Exercises at the Canine Gym

I want Lucy’s head position level (with the floor) to decrease tension on her neck and lower back and want her to gain strength and awareness of her hind legs. We start with the ‘simple’ Down to Stand. This exercise is actually quite challenging if a true kick back stand is attained. I used my 4×4’s set up as a narrow chute to encourage Lucy into a sphinx position. The core muscles are engaged and the hind legs must work to lift the rear end into a stand. This exercise was one of the first of Lucy’s Home Exercise Program. Now Lucy’s owner is observing good form and rewarding Lucy.

For additional information: www.dogtread.com


 

Dr-Kerry_FisherAbout the Author: Kerry Fisher, DVM, CCRP ~ your Canine Fitness Expert. Throughout her career as a veterinarian, Dr. Fisher has focused on “Pre-hab and Rehab” for animals, pioneering therapeutic & conditioning exercises with FitPAWS Equipment. She owns Canine Rehab ~ Canine Fitness Unleashed!, a Colorado based Canine Gym with Injury Prevention and Canine Rehabilitation services. She has a passion for and experience with Sports Medicine for sporting, search & rescue, performance, working and hunting dogs. Dr. Kerry also has unique concepts for working with senior canine fitness, weight management, pain management, and behavior modification through exercise. She provides educational hands-on seminars and workshops worldwide. Do you want to take your dog’s fitness to another level? Let’s Get in Touch for a Fitness Assessment and Coaching for your dog. Dr. Kerry uses the DogTread Treadmill-Gait4Dog integrated software system for early Lameness Detection and monitoring the progress your dog is making during the course of rehabilitation. Injury prevention is key! Dr. Fisher is an athlete herself, enjoying endurance triathlons, mountain biking, bicycle touring, backpacking and telemark skiing. She biked, camped and toured 4,000 miles across the Northern Tier of the USA with her yellow Labrador, Mr. Mitchell. 2015 brings some challenging events to her plate: Ironman Arizona (140.6 mile event) and Leadville 100 mountain bike race (103 mile race at 10,000 feet+ elevation). As founder of Grit Gals, Kerry blogs to share her training tactics for these intense races. Human Fitness and Canine Fitness intertwined – to help you and your dogs reach your goals.

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Canine Fitness Workout for Blind Dogs https://dogtread.com/canine-fitness-workout-for-blind-dogs/ Fri, 10 Jul 2015 21:51:34 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9637 Blind dogs can exercise safely with the DogTread Treadmill

 

Blind dogs can exercise safely with the DogTread Treadmill

Zeus is 12 years old and loves his weekend hikes

On a recent hike with Zeus in the high mountains of Colorado, it became apparent that he has lost even more depth perception. At home, he must have everything memorized – and I’m definitely not one to rearrange the furniture weekly. So when hiking over rocks and logs and a variety of terrain, little Zeus marched along without any concerns.

 

When Zeus walked right over a small rock ledge and stepped confidently …. into the air….. I knew we had to make some changes in his exercise plans.

Zeus just stepped off the rock ledge and stumbled, did a summersault, got up and kept right on hiking. It didn’t phase him physically and mentally (something to be said for all the canine conditioning we have done over the years!). It sure made my heart tumble. I am here to help guide and protect this little guy. From now on, he will be on leash for hikes until an area is inspected as sage for him.

 The best way to exercise a blind dog (big or small) is to use the DogTread Treadmill.

This treadmill is made specifically for dogs. Zeus has exercised on the canine treadmill for several years so he hops right on even with diminished eyesight. Using a k9 treadmill with a dog blind from birth or a blind dog that has never been on a treadmill is equally as easy. If you are having any trouble treading a blind dog, send me an email!

 Now Zeus treads inside 3-4 times/week

Zeus comes over to my Canine Gym to work out while I’m doing my charting or consulting. He does his treadmill warm up of walking 5 minutes, walks or walk/trots for 10 minutes at various speeds, then does some sit to stands on the treadmill and some individual leg lifts. We add in some strength work using the FitPAWS balance equipment and he cools down with a 5 minute walk. The rest of the time at the Canine Gym is spent sleeping!

Blind dogs can exercise safely with the DogTread Treadmill

 

For additional information: www.dogtread.com


 

Dr-Kerry_FisherAbout the Author: Kerry Fisher, DVM, CCRP ~ your Canine Fitness Expert. Throughout her career as a veterinarian, Dr. Fisher has focused on “Pre-hab and Rehab” for animals, pioneering therapeutic & conditioning exercises with FitPAWS Equipment. She owns Canine Rehab ~ Canine Fitness Unleashed!, a Colorado based Canine Gym with Injury Prevention and Canine Rehabilitation services. She has a passion for and experience with Sports Medicine for sporting, search & rescue, performance, working and hunting dogs. Dr. Kerry also has unique concepts for working with senior canine fitness, weight management, pain management, and behavior modification through exercise. She provides educational hands-on seminars and workshops worldwide. Do you want to take your dog’s fitness to another level? Let’s Get in Touch for a Fitness Assessment and Coaching for your dog. Dr. Kerry uses the DogTread Treadmill-Gait4Dog integrated software system for early Lameness Detection and monitoring the progress your dog is making during the course of rehabilitation. Injury prevention is key! Dr. Fisher is an athlete herself, enjoying endurance triathlons, mountain biking, bicycle touring, backpacking and telemark skiing. She biked, camped and toured 4,000 miles across the Northern Tier of the USA with her yellow Labrador, Mr. Mitchell. 2015 brings some challenging events to her plate: Ironman Arizona (140.6 mile event) and Leadville 100 mountain bike race (103 mile race at 10,000 feet+ elevation). As founder of Grit Gals, Kerry blogs to share her training tactics for these intense races. Human Fitness and Canine Fitness intertwined – to help you and your dogs reach your goals.

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Jazz – Achilles Rehab – Part III https://dogtread.com/jazz-achilles-rehab-part-iii/ Fri, 03 Jul 2015 17:52:07 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9624 Dr. Kerry Fisher - Jazz - Achilles Rehab

Dr. Kerry Fisher – Jazz – Achilles Rehab

How to Strengthen the Hind End of a Dog?

Labradors – one of the Breeds that Never Quit

Remember Jazz? She injured her Achilles tendon awhile back, underwent canine physical therapy for the acute injury. She also has bilateral stifle (knee) arthritis. She’s now ‘enrolled’ in a canine exercise program to strengthen her back, core and hind legs. She is a hunting Labrador who doesn’t know she has chronic issues. During exercises I work with her to learn to ‘Slow Down’ so we can obtain good form.

 Why is it Important to Strengthen her Hind Legs?

Most dogs walk around using primarily their front legs – the hind legs just follow along. Jazz needs to strengthen her Gluteals, Hamstrings, and Quads. I am gradually helping her relearn to sit in a normal sit position. Muscle weakness, decreased stifle and hock joint range of motion, decreased neuromuscular input and lack of awareness add up to a very abnormal sit position. This will take some time to retrain. By strengthening her hind legs I hope to help Jazz obtain a more normal sit position, decrease compensatory body movements due to her injuries, decrease back pain and prevent future injuries.

 How to Strengthen a Dog’s Hind Legs? Elevate Front Legs!

What does elevating the front legs do? This adds body weight to Jazz’s hind legs causing the entire hind end muscle groups to work harder. Jazz is dynamically strengthening her hind end through exercises. This is done by using FitPAWS balance equipment (which also works her core muscles) and the DogTread Canine Treadmill.

 Working with FitPaws Balance Pad & DogTread

I created a chute out of 2 4×4’s helping guide Jazz to obtain more correct neuromuscular input while retraining a correct sit. Initially I want Jazz to ‘Get the Game’: walking into the chute rather than on top of the 4×4’s. Next she stands with front feet elevated on the Balance Pad. Next Jazz moves to standing with front feet on the side of the Canine Treadmill, and then backs down onto the Balance Pad. Jazz is having a great time with the clicker, treats and working out. We do about 10 reps of this exercise, add a Sit to Stand in here and there (due to her issues, I actually prefer a Squat to Stand), and then give her a rest.

 Remember to Warm Up and Cool Down Rehab Patients

Jazz warmed up & cooled down with 10 minute walks on the DogTread Treadmill.

 Jazz has a DEADLINE:

Pheasant hunting by October.

 

For additional information: www.dogtread.com


 

Dr-Kerry_FisherAbout the Author: Kerry Fisher, DVM, CCRP ~ your Canine Fitness Expert. Throughout her career as a veterinarian, Dr. Fisher has focused on “Pre-hab and Rehab” for animals, pioneering therapeutic & conditioning exercises with FitPAWS Equipment. She owns Canine Rehab ~ Canine Fitness Unleashed!, a Colorado based Canine Gym with Injury Prevention and Canine Rehabilitation services. She has a passion for and experience with Sports Medicine for sporting, search & rescue, performance, working and hunting dogs. Dr. Kerry also has unique concepts for working with senior canine fitness, weight management, pain management, and behavior modification through exercise. She provides educational hands-on seminars and workshops worldwide. Do you want to take your dog’s fitness to another level? Let’s Get in Touch for a Fitness Assessment and Coaching for your dog. Dr. Kerry uses the DogTread Treadmill-Gait4Dog integrated software system for early Lameness Detection and monitoring the progress your dog is making during the course of rehabilitation. Injury prevention is key! Dr. Fisher is an athlete herself, enjoying endurance triathlons, mountain biking, bicycle touring, backpacking and telemark skiing. She biked, camped and toured 4,000 miles across the Northern Tier of the USA with her yellow Labrador, Mr. Mitchell. 2015 brings some challenging events to her plate: Ironman Arizona (140.6 mile event) and Leadville 100 mountain bike race (103 mile race at 10,000 feet+ elevation). As founder of Grit Gals, Kerry blogs to share her training tactics for these intense races. Human Fitness and Canine Fitness intertwined – to help you and your dogs reach your goals.

 

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How to Beat the Heat and Keep Your Dog Fit https://dogtread.com/how-to-beat-the-heat-and-keep-your-dog-fit/ https://dogtread.com/how-to-beat-the-heat-and-keep-your-dog-fit/#comments Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:32:30 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=5422 Beat the Heat and Keep Your Dog FitDogs need exercise – even when it is hot. So how can you keep your dog in shape when the weather temps climb? Hot weather adds a level of danger that can put your dog at risk, especially for senior dogs, dogs with known breathing problems, and overweight pets, or those that have not had conditioning to warmer weather. Try these tips to eliminate the risks of dehydration or heat stroke:

1)      Provide Extra Water

Keep fresh cool water on hand (walks and runs) to keep your dog hydrated. Change the water frequently and add ice cubes or flavored broth for added attraction. Recently we tried this vitamin enhanced natural flavored formula from Licks® that our dogs loved!

2)      Outdoor Exercise

Limit outdoor exposure. If you are going to exercise outside choose cooler hours, trails with shade, or activities that put you closer to the water – and remember to put sunscreen on your dog. You may also try a cooling vest to help reduce core temperature on early morning walks. K9FITvest provides a cooling option so you can add a cool gel pack to the K9FITvest during your outdoor activities to keep them cool . Use with or without the resistance. Remember when working outside in warmer temperatures be respectful – if you are uncomfortable, your dog probably is too.

Canine Gym_Exercises3)      Indoor Exercise

There are many exercises that you can do inside to keep your dog fit and cool. Set up an indoor Canine Gym at Home. A Dog Treadmill that simulates outdoor terrain – like DogTread – provide an excellent way for your dog to get his cardio fix and stay cool. Resistance K9FITvest can be used for a number of inside strength training activities and you can add cool packs for outdoor exercise. Also, balance products like FitPAWS equipment can help strengthen your dog’s core and endurance.

For more information to keep your dog fit and cool:
5 Hot Weather Tips and Tricks

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Jazz – Achilles Rehab – Part II https://dogtread.com/jazz-achilles-rehab-part-ii/ Fri, 19 Jun 2015 16:54:09 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9589 Jazz Learns a New Language & Dynamic Movement

Dog Tread Blog by Kerry FisherJazz is learning a new language

Jazz injured her Achilles tendon awhile back, underwent canine physical therapy for the acute injury and is now progressing to exercises to strengthen her back, core and hind legs. As mentioned in last week’s blog, she also has lived with bilateral cruciate disease, having TPLO surgeries years ago. She has always had issues with her right stifle even with the surgery. The new language? Clicker Training.

 Why add in Clicker Training to Rehab a Senior Dog?

Clicker trained dogs understand what I am asking them to do during canine rehabilitation and fitness exercises. It’s much easier to encourage proper exercise form and technique when a dog can be asked for dynamic movements rather than have me place their body/limbs into a position.

 What is Dynamic Movement?

If I push Jazz’s rear end into a sit what does this do to strengthen her muscles? Nothing. And I might even hurt her if she falls off balance while moving into the sit. Dynamic movement occurs when I ask Jazz to sit and she sits on her own, using her own muscles. Dynamic movement increases muscle strength.

 Remember to Warm Up your Rehab Patients

Jazz has been warming up with 10 minute walks on the DogTread treadmill. Why the treadmill? Well, if you knew Jazz, you’d understand. When outside she has only one speed – full speed ahead. Hmmm, maybe through clicker training I can encourage her to walk on a leash rather than run.

 Ground Exercises First

When working with a dog that does not use her hind leg properly due to stifle disease and Achilles injury, I like to start with exercises on the ground. Balance work comes later. I want Jazz to understand that her right hind leg needs to be brought under her body when she sits. This will help decrease compensatory back pain and strengthen her hind leg muscles.

Initially I just ask for one or two reps of a proper sit to stand (STS). Note how Jazz sits on the ground with her entire leg abducted to the side. She also tends to rock backwards. When I add in the aerobic step bench, due to the narrower platform, she can perform a sit with the leg in a more normal and more functional position. Then I begin to add Sit to Stands on the DogTread Treadmill while it is moving at 0.5mph.

Observation and good dog handling skills make canine rehabilitation much more successful. Timing, placement of food, hands, body position, cues and clicking can add depth to a rehab session with dogs.

Dog Tread Blog by Kerry Fisher

IMG_6216

 

KerryFisher_DogTread-Blog_6206

 

 

 

 

Jazz gave me a DEADLINE:

Jazz told me she wants to return to full activity for pheasant hunting by October.

For additional information:
www.dogtread.com
www.clickertraining.com

 


 

Dr-Kerry_FisherAbout the Author: Kerry Fisher, DVM, CCRP ~ your Canine Fitness Expert. Throughout her career as a veterinarian, Dr. Fisher has focused on “Pre-hab and Rehab” for animals, pioneering therapeutic & conditioning exercises with FitPAWS Equipment. She owns Canine Rehab ~ Canine Fitness Unleashed!, a Colorado based Canine Gym with Injury Prevention and Canine Rehabilitation services. She has a passion for and experience with Sports Medicine for sporting, search & rescue, performance, working and hunting dogs. Dr. Kerry also has unique concepts for working with senior canine fitness, weight management, pain management, and behavior modification through exercise. She provides educational hands-on seminars and workshops worldwide. Do you want to take your dog’s fitness to another level? Let’s Get in Touch for a Fitness Assessment and Coaching for your dog. Dr. Kerry uses the DogTread Treadmill-Gait4Dog integrated software system for early Lameness Detection and monitoring the progress your dog is making during the course of rehabilitation. Injury prevention is key! Dr. Fisher is an athlete herself, enjoying endurance triathlons, mountain biking, bicycle touring, backpacking and telemark skiing. She biked, camped and toured 4,000 miles across the Northern Tier of the USA with her yellow Labrador, Mr. Mitchell. 2015 brings some challenging events to her plate: Ironman Arizona (140.6 mile event) and Leadville 100 mountain bike race (103 mile race at 10,000 feet+ elevation). As founder of Grit Gals, Kerry blogs to share her training tactics for these intense races. Human Fitness and Canine Fitness intertwined – to help you and your dogs reach your goals.

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Warm Up Exercise – SPIN https://dogtread.com/warm-up-exercise-spin/ Wed, 17 Jun 2015 13:41:36 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=7648 K9FITvest Warm up Exercise - SPINSpin is a great way to warm up the body, increase flexibility and at the same time it enables you to work on balance and weight shifting.

Dog Workout ToolsTOOLS:
Collar or Harness, Leash, K9FITvest (try with and without to note form).

 

K9 Workout DurationDURATION:
For Warm Up: 3-5 times each side

 

K9 Workout IntesityADD INTENSITY:

Slow turns accentuating movement is best. To increase intensity add instability surface.

 

K9 Workout strengthen

STRENGTHENS
Front limbs, neck and back

 

 

K(FITvest by DogTread Canine Gym Gear sWag TIPWhat is Spin?
Warm up exercise that encourages your dog to pivot in place.
Where Can I Do Spin?
Spin can be performed inside or outside. Start on a level surface. Increase intensity by using a balance board or disc.
Spin Guidelines:
1) Use a High-Value Smelly Treat for a Lure
2) Position your Dog to Stand in Front of you
3) Place Treat in Front of Dogs Nose and Say “Turn”
4) Move Your Hand in a Circle Luring Your Dog with Treat
5) Reward When Your Dog Completes a Circle. Repeat Other Direction

Goal:
Strive for full circle and remember to repeat both sides.

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Achilles Tendinosos Rehab with Dog Treadmill https://dogtread.com/achilles-tendinosos-rehab-with-dog-treadmill/ Fri, 12 Jun 2015 01:30:43 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=9575 DogTread Treadmill work rounds out Jazz’s Canine Rehabilitation Plan

IMG_6110

Jazz recently injured her Achilles Tendon

Jazz is a “full-speed ahead” 7 ½ year old lab. She is an amazing pheasant retriever and loves to hike, run, swim and play ‘chuck-it’. When she was about a year old she tore her Cranial Cruciate ligaments in both legs and had bilateral TPLO. A few weeks ago, she came up lame after playing hard. Her right hind hock was swollen and tender. Her diagnosis? Achilles tendon injury.

 What is the Canine Achilles?

IMG_6105

You may have heard of Achilles Tendon also called the Common Calcaneal Tendon (CCT) or the Gastrocnemius Tendon. This tendon is the convergence of 3 distinct musculotendinous units at the calcaneus (the back point of the hock) :the gastrocnemius tendon (GT), the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), and the common tendons of the biceps femoris, gracilis, and semitendinosus muscles. The gastrocnemius muscle originates as both lateral and medial heads on the caudal aspect of the lateral and medial femoral condyles, then spans the stifle joint (canine knee) before inserting on the calcaneus. The gastrocnemius tendon is the largest and most powerful extensor of the hock joint. The Achilles Tendon acts as the major extensor of the hock.

 Do Humans have an Achilles Tendon?

Yes. You’ve probably heard the term “Achilles Heel”. Over 230,000 humans experience injuries of the Achilles tendon per year in the U.S. alone. The undue strains are caused by a variety of factors, including: tightness or weakness of the leg, knee, hip, or back; high or low arches; uneven leg lengths; alternating between high (2”) heels and exercise shoes; and/or sudden (rather than gradual) increases in training, such as running faster, further, or up steeper hills.

How does a dog injure their Achilles tendon?

Many types of injuries can occur in the Achilles’ tendon. The most common Achilles tendon injuries are Achilles tendinosis (also known as Achilles tendinopathy) and Achilles tendon rupture.

The most common causes of Achilles injuries:

  • traumatic (lacerations, blunt force trauma, severe stretching/pulling)
  • atraumatic (chronic and degenerative in nature)

Any dog (or cat) can injure the Achilles’ tendon by external trauma (for example, smooth or barbed wire fence lacerations, getting kicked by a cow or horse, chain link fence climbing with entangling the hind foot into one of the holes and falling, or a multitude of other mishaps.

Degenerative cases of CCT rupture have not been well-described. This may be due to long-term “wear and tear” or perhaps genetic. In humans, use of fluoroquinolones or chronic use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been implicated. In dogs, an association with obesity, diabetes, or Cushing’s disease has been noted.

 Are there canine breeds prone to chronic Achilles problems?

Atraumatic injuries can be seen in any breed of dog, but Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds and Doberman Pinschers are overrepresented. Usually Achilles Tendon injuries occur in dogs 5+ years of age. Jazz fits right in this category!

 How is an Achilles injury diagnosed?

Signs vary from lameness with swelling around the Achilles to walking flat-footed (with complete rupture). Physical exam, radiographs, ultrasound and MRI are used to diagnose this serious condition.

 How is a Canine Achilles injury treated?

Complete rupture of the Achilles is a veterinary emergency situation requiring immediate care and surgery. Sprains/strains are usually treated with rest and rehabilitation. Return to full function usually has a good prognosis.

 What about Jazz?

IMG_6124Jazz rested for about 8 weeks with leash walking only – most done inside on the DogTread treadmill. Her chuck-it days of wildly chasing the tennis ball, flipping and maybe standing on her head then rushing back to drop the ball for her next throw are over. During her restricted activity time, the area was iced several times/day and she received twice weekly acupuncture treatments to reduce inflammation. Treadmill walking has been gradually increased; now she is walking for 20 minutes/ twice a day.

 

With her bilateral stifle conditions, Jazz prefers to walk with most of her weight on her forelimbs. The recent Achilles injury has caused her to prefer laying down rto standing. When she does sit, she has trouble sitting square.

 

 

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What’s next?

Jazz will keep working on the dog treadmill as her gait can be monitored while treading rather than walking outside. I can encourage her to raise her head to increase weight bearing on her hind leg while she treads; this is impossible to do while leash walking.

She will be starting in with some floor exercises and progress to balance exercises using FitPAWS equipment. The goal is return to full activity and pheasant hunting by October.

For additional information: www.dogtread.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achilles’_heel

http://www.vetsurge


 

Dr-Kerry_FisherAbout the Author: Kerry Fisher, DVM, CCRP ~ your Canine Fitness Expert. Throughout her career as a veterinarian, Dr. Fisher has focused on “Pre-hab and Rehab” for animals, pioneering therapeutic & conditioning exercises with FitPAWS Equipment. She owns Canine Rehab ~ Canine Fitness Unleashed!, a Colorado based Canine Gym with Injury Prevention and Canine Rehabilitation services. She has a passion for and experience with Sports Medicine for sporting, search & rescue, performance, working and hunting dogs. Dr. Kerry also has unique concepts for working with senior canine fitness, weight management, pain management, and behavior modification through exercise. She provides educational hands-on seminars and workshops worldwide. Do you want to take your dog’s fitness to another level? Let’s Get in Touch for a Fitness Assessment and Coaching for your dog. Dr. Kerry uses the DogTread Treadmill-Gait4Dog integrated software system for early Lameness Detection and monitoring the progress your dog is making during the course of rehabilitation. Injury prevention is key! Dr. Fisher is an athlete herself, enjoying endurance triathlons, mountain biking, bicycle touring, backpacking and telemark skiing. She biked, camped and toured 4,000 miles across the Northern Tier of the USA with her yellow Labrador, Mr. Mitchell. 2015 brings some challenging events to her plate: Ironman Arizona (140.6 mile event) and Leadville 100 mountain bike race (103 mile race at 10,000 feet+ elevation). As founder of Grit Gals, Kerry blogs to share her training tactics for these intense races. Human Fitness and Canine Fitness intertwined – to help you and your dogs reach your goals.

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K9 Cross Training https://dogtread.com/k9-cross-training/ Tue, 09 Jun 2015 22:01:10 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=7750 Pawsitive_PerformanceIn the human world the term “cross-training” is used quite often to suggest that doing different types of strength, balance and coordination training helps to improve performance.  The canine world works much the same way.

Canine conditioning or cross-training exercises are a great way to keep your dog in shape, encourage weight loss, maintain current weight, keep your dog mentally and physically challenged and reduce the chance of injury through strength, flexibility and weight distribution training.  Participating in K9 Conditioning exercises just 10-15 minutes 2-3 x a week can go a long way to improving your dog’s stability and performance.

When you are training and developing a dog’s skills, canine conditioning HAS to be part of your program if you are interested in participating in performance sports long term and without injury.  Your dog’s structure, confidence on equipment, speed in which they are traveling, awareness of their rear legs, how to efficiently use their core and STRONG supporting muscles around their joints all play a part in keeping your dog in the game.

Some of the ways you can participate in “cross training” your canine athlete:
Learning a proper warm up and cool down strategy to improve joint mobility before exercise or performance

  • 1891070_10152262262386563_1735832840_nThe use of FitPAWS inflatable equipment for strength and balance training.   Knowing correct body position is important to maximize the benefits of using this type of equipment.
  •  The use of Canine Gym equipment such as the K9FITbone and the K9FITVest (weighted or cooling).
  •   Trick training for balance and coordination – body position is again very important here.
  •  Using a Dog Tread Treadmill for sustained trotting to build endurance
  • Cavaletti training – spacing between the poles and height of poles are very specific for improving gait and forelimb and hindlimb reach.
  • Swimming your dog, straight, and turning in both directions and using all four limbs
  • Flexibility training  – stretching

It is our job as handlers to go the “extra mile” and learn how to design a program for our canine athletes.  If you are unsure of what to do, seek advice from someone who knows.

Check out Bobbie’s online classes and website to find out more about K9 Conditioning and how she can help you design a program for your dog.  She offers in-person private lessons AND online private lessons through video exchange.  Contact me today to learn more.

CanineCoach_BobbieLyonsAbout the Author

Bobbie Lyons, Cert CF has been training and competing in agility with her dogs for over 10 years. She has also participates in herding, and teaches in person classes on trick training, improving focus and human workouts with your dog. She currently has three Border Collies and an Australian Shepherd.
Bobbie Lyons, Cert. C. F. Ph. 503-329-1235
Targeted Conditioning Programs for K9 Athletes: Private Lessons, Online Classes, & Workshops
Website: http://www.pawsitive-performance.com/
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Puppy Exercises https://dogtread.com/puppy-exercises/ https://dogtread.com/puppy-exercises/#comments Fri, 05 Jun 2015 13:53:49 +0000 https://dogtread.com/?p=7505 Exercise Blog For Growing Puppies by Anthony Worener DogTread Canine CoachThe common opinion among Veterinarians and Rehab professionals is that structured and intense exercise should not start until about 6 months of age and even then, nothing vigorous until the dog has reached skeletal maturity, which is around 2 years old for most breeds.

During the puppy growth years, the body’s growth plates are slowly closing. Disruption of the growth plates can cause injury. Aside from the 2 year rule-of-thumb, the only real way to tell if the growth plates have formed is with the visual assistance of an x-ray. For this reason dog owners are cautioned to be careful until they are around 2 years old.  After 6 months, a more formal routine can be established, but owners should avoid endurance activities until the 2-year mark.

Puppies have a lot of extra energy and often owners want to exercise it out of them. I like to explain to people that there is the dog’s drive and their tolerance.  Being aware of this helps avoid overuse issues and injuries.  We as owners need to watch the tolerance of the activity and know when the dog has had enough.  As an example, some Labs will chase a ball until they nearly collapse, which is dictated by drive.  We need to look for signs of fatigue or compensation from the activity and duration of play, and stop it before they exceed their body’s tolerance.  Be aware of the size of other dogs they will play with. In some dogs that have very high drive, using excessive or too aggressive types of play can be detrimental and cause behavioral issues. A puppy’s body is going through a lot of change, and again, the activities should be not be too rigorous and always fun and positive.

workout DogTread K9FITbone BalanceFor dogs younger than 6 months, start with foundational movement patterns such as flexion, extension, rotation and side bending.  Basic obedience activities are a good place to start these movement patterns.  The idea with puppies is to start building a solid base they can grow from.  Always watch their posture, technique, and body position.  Exercises should be looked at from a developmental standpoint, not a rigorous exercise routine.  Work on these foundational movement patterns and provide them with various textures and objects to explore and build their curiosity.  Start with basics like sitting, standing, down, turns, walking backwards, walking up/over different objects and through baby pools.  Add hide and seek games with their toys or treats, short leash walks, and hikes.  Avoid excessive jumping higher than their ankles.  Work on balance and body awareness and getting them use to standing on size specific balance balls, FitBones, and other similar objects.  For the most part the activities should be self guided.

At 6 months to approx 2 years old, a more structured program can be followed.  These are some additional examples of age appropriate exercises.  You can begin to do these 3-4 times a week as they tolerate the activities.  Continue and expand on the obedience activities and increase for repetitions and frequency. Progress balance and stability on K9FITbones, Donuts, Peanut and other balance equipment. Integrate Cavaletti rails, gait training and introduce them to treadmill walking and trotting.  Practice light jumping to knee height and play with gentle tugging.

At two years of age or until the growth plates are closed, you can begin sport specific training and endurance work.

Remember that you are building a foundation for future activities or sporting events, so ensure safety, and above all make it fun for both you and your dog.

 

DogTread Canine Fitness CoachAbout the Author: Anthony Woerner, PTA and CCRP  develops canine training programs to help bring performance dogs and companion pets to the next level of fitness. Combining his in-depth knowledge from working with both human and animal patients, he has achieved an excellent understanding of structure and movement.

Anthony has developed the unique ability to understand breed specifics, structure, and movement. He uses his extensive knowledge and his healing hands to know how to best treat each animal. As a canine fitness instructor, his clients include dogs that compete on an elite level to the dogs that need fitness training to maintain a healthy lifestyle as a pet.

Anthony Woerner PTA, CCRP
DogTread Canine Fitness Coach and Professional Advisor.

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